One of my goals for 2018 is to learn new techniques, improve myself in photography.  With recommendations from a group of friends, I joined in this journey with P52clicks.  It is a community where photographers all over the world encourage each other to learn

12-months • 12-techniques • 1-photo a week • 52-opportunities for growth • for the everyday photographer • a new year, a new artist.

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One of my goals for 2018 is to learn new techniques, improve myself in photography.  With recommendations from a group of friends, I joined in this journey with P52clicks.  A community where photographers all over the world encourage each other to learn 12 techniques a year (1 technique per month).  We usually have about 4 or 5 weeks to learn that technique for the month and to practice it with our camera.  Along the journey, we shared our images on social media and in the group for feedback.  This month, a group of my photography friends decided to show case our favorites from the month of January.  

“Tell me and I’ll forget.  Show me and I may remember.  Involve me and I learn.”

Benjamin Franklin

Instead of showcasing, I decided to write more of what I have learned from January.  The technique I took on was to capture subjects under low light conditions.  Low light is not necessarily night photography, it is only when the light source is limited whether it is sun light or artificial lights.  Let’s take your bathroom for example, most of the bathrooms have limited light source, it might have a small window that has some lights peeked through but the rest of the room is dark.  I called that little light peeking through “light pocket.”  Low light technique can be very addicting if you know how to manipulate little “light pockets” to your advantage or you can create a low light condition by limiting lights pouring into the environment you are setting up the shots.  Some might ask, why would you limit lights into your environment?  My answer is to create a light source focus only on your subject.  This will create nice shadows and lights on your subject to capture the true feelings of the moment.  After capturing some photos using this technique, I have a few notes or more of lessons for myself in the future.  I hope you will find this helpful.  I love this technique so for sure you will be seeing more of it in Storyteller Through Photos in the next coming months.

Lesson 1: When I walked into a room, here are a few things I ask myself: Where is the light coming from?  What kind of light source do I have? (natural lights or artificial lights) and Where will I place the subject using the available light source to capture the story?  A little careful assessment and preparation will help create more emotional and dramatic photos.

Lesson 2: Manual Mode is as always highly recommended.  You got the full control!

Lesson 3: Don’t be afraid to increase ISO, prefer noisy photos over blurry ones.  Know your camera and lens well to see how much noise they can handle.

Lesson 4: lower shutter speed (long exposure) to get more lights, tripod is highly recommended in this method to avoid camera shake – still need to try this.

Lesson 5: Shoot wide open, which means low f-number.  When you get past the kit lens, you will never go back.  Kit lens usually has the owest F/3.6 while other lenses with F/1.8 or 1/4 can create much more desireable low light photos.  If you are working on a budget, I would say try 50mm 1.8 (I should with Canon).  This lens is a great learning tool for beginner.  Though I have moved on up with other lens, I still go back to this lens from time to time because it’s so light.  I can easily carry it in my purse anywhere with the camera.

Lesson 6: Don’t be afraid to use artificial lights.

Lesson 7: use light (natural or artificial) to create dramatic effects.

Lesson 8: Don’t be afraid to shut down some light source to intensify the story in the photos.

Lesson 9: Don’t forget to have fun and use any of the combinations above to your likings (just like cooking, you are the one creating the recipes to your tastes).  Photography is art, create your own recipe, even breaking the rules is acceptable to create your own piece of art.

here are some of my favorites from January everyday’s moment

In the photo below, the light was coming from a window of his left.

Lesson 3: Don’t be afraid to increase ISO camera setting: SS 1/100, ISO 3200, freelens (no F stop info)

 

This photo was taken with 50mm, 1.8, you can see a little haze around him, I actually used my range oven light to light up his face.  I used double exposure with a little plastic to create a little glow in the photo.

Lesson 5: Shoot wide open. SS 1/125, F 1.8, ISO 1250
Lesson 6: Don’t be afraid to use artificial lights.
Lesson 6: Don’t be afraid to use artificial lights. My light source is the bathroom ceiling light, having the door slightly open to light up just this guy’s face.
Lesson 7: use the lights through window to create light and shadow effect
Lesson 8: Don’t be afraid to shut down some light source to intensify the story in the photos. The entire house lights were shut down, only one flashlight they carried on a stick with them.

My talented friend Suzi from Moments by Suzi also played along with this technique, please check out her low light favorites here, you will enjoy her work just as much as I do.

That’s it for this month, please check back for February photography technique.  Untill then if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me, I would love to hear from you.

 Thuvan – Your gal behind the lens here at FrameThisMomentPhotography

2018 January

January Photo Gallery

I challenge myself to do a photo a day then published it in this gallery.  I have different prompts every day or at least every week so that I can get familiar with different techniques.

This month’s prompts: lowlight, freelensing, rule of third, compassion, lights and shadow, in the frame, self-portrait, teaching & learning together, brothers, out of focus, morning snuggle, step by step, celebration, season – winter theme, backlight, curiosity, negative space, what I see, imagination, bath time, play time, run away, reflect, double exposure.  So far my most favorites were lowlight, freelensing, teaching and learning, and double exposure.  Double exposure, lowlight were very challenging, freelensing is quite difficult too but I’m getting the hang of it.

Continue reading “2018 January”

Flying with Toddler

It is that time when you are ready to take your toddler to see the world or to visit families and friends.  Before booking that flight, read on these tips to help you prepare and make the trip as fun and enjoyable for you and your toddler.  Here are some tips that I came up with after flying with my toddler.

    1.  Booking the flight:
      • Book either an early or mid afternoon flight, around their nap time is best.
      • Nonstop flight if at all possible.
      • If your toddler is active and likes to move around, I’d choose an aisle seat.  This will allow your toddler to walk around if need to.
    2. Getting prepared for the flight:
      • For young toddler that are still on bottle, bring a bottle of milk so he/she can suck on during take off and landing.  If your toddler is still breastfeeding (yay for breastfeeding babies), you know what to do mom.
      • Be prepared for security line.  Bring an umbrella stroller or a stroller car seat so that your toddler can rest in it.
      • For older toddler, bring lollipops or something to chew and swallow during take off and landing.
      • Bring a few favorite books, coloring books and some crayola and a few favorite small toys, and ONE favorite comfort thing (blanket… etc).  Be careful with comfort thing because you will have to make sure you don’t lose it or you will be miserable for the rest of the trip.  I let my kids use multiple blankets so there’s no one comfort.  We can take any blankets with us and it’s no issue to replace them.
      • I don’t use tablet but there are people using them to entertain their kids (music/movies/games) and it’s fine.  The reason I don’t use tablets is because I want to teach my kids to travel light and enjoy things around them such as art galleries at the airport hallways or making conversations with other travelers.
      • Separate your things in plastic ziplock bags so you can see them easily.
    3.  Day of travel:
      • Get to the airport early.
      • Car seat and strollers are free luggages.  Be sure to bag them so there will be no damage.
      • Be prepare for security line: Let them know if you have to bring milk/water/juice bottle in.
      • Don’t forget to bring all those items you prepared in #2
      • Bring some snacks for yourself and your toddler (let it be chip, crackers, or fruits), the airport allows you to bring those.
      • Let your toddler run around.  If it’s too crowded at your gate, find another corner that has space for your toddler to run around or you can take him/her up and down the hallway enjoying the art galleries  or looking out the windows to see planes landing and taking off.
      • Time to pull out those activities book, reading.  One thing at a time so you don’t have a cleaning chore when it is time to take off.
      • Take your time, and use flight attendant and your fellow travelers as your allies.  You can ask for assistance to put luggage onto the overhead bin.
      • As much as we all like to board and settle early, I would take my toddler in as late as possible.  If you are traveling with your spouse, divide and conquer, let your spouse board first with all gears, then you can board with your toddler later.  This will allow toddler some wiggly time out in open space.
      • Bring a surprise toy in case for calm down period.
      • Don’t be afraid to ask a stranger to act as an aeroplane police if needed.  Sometimes a stranger’s voice is louder than parent’s voice.

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I hope you enjoy your first flight with your toddler, it will be fun.  Key is to keep them entertained and their brain intrigued.

 

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